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Species promotion Northern Lapwing

The Northern Lapwing – rescuing the aerial acrobat

The draining of wetlands and the subsequent intensification of agricultural management led to a sharp decline of the Northern Lapwing in Switzerland in the 20th century. Only as a result of intense conservation and promotion efforts was it possible to save the Northern Lapwing from extinction. Its population has more than doubled since 2005 and around 200 pairs are now breeding in Switzerland again. The rare ground-nesting bird is still listed as critically endangered (CR) on the Red List and is dependent on specific measures.

Domain Conservation
Unit Agricultural Habitats
Topic Species Recovery, Population Development, Habitat Promotion
Habitat farmland, wetlands, meadows and pastures
Project start 2005
Project status ongoing
Project management Simon Hohl
Project region Lucerne

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Bird species
Northern Lapwing
The Northern Lapwing is probably the best known wader and one of the most conspicuous inhabitants of open country. It is unmistakable due to its outline with the unique, long, wispy crest, the purple sheen of the dark plumage and its voice. It is also known as Peewit, an imitation of its mating c...
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Other resources
external link
Kiebitzschutz in Europa (in German)
lapwingconservation.org
Avinews
Wie retten wir den Kiebitz? (in German)
Audio
Der Kiebitz (in German)
vogelwarte.ch/news/der-kiebitz-simon-hohl/
Agricultural habitats link
Unit

Agricultural habitats

We promote wildlife-friendly agriculture with more high-quality and better-connected habitats, fewer artificial fertilisers and fewer pesticides.

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